Regional Decarbonization Framework

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A Partnership to Move the Region to Zero Carbon Emissions

The global climate is changing, and the effects are felt acutely at the local level through higher frequency and intensity of extreme heat events, droughts, wildfires, storms, and sea level rise. Furthermore, the growing economic, social, and environmental impacts associated with a changing climate are causing immediate and long-term impacts to our ecosystems, food production, health, safety, jobs, businesses, and communities across the San Diego region, particularly in underserved populations that are impacted disproportionately.

On January 27, 2021, the Board of Supervisors took action to create what has now developed

A Partnership to Move the Region to Zero Carbon Emissions

The global climate is changing, and the effects are felt acutely at the local level through higher frequency and intensity of extreme heat events, droughts, wildfires, storms, and sea level rise. Furthermore, the growing economic, social, and environmental impacts associated with a changing climate are causing immediate and long-term impacts to our ecosystems, food production, health, safety, jobs, businesses, and communities across the San Diego region, particularly in underserved populations that are impacted disproportionately.

On January 27, 2021, the Board of Supervisors took action to create what has now developed into the integrated Regional Decarbonization Framework (Framework), recognizing that the County of San Diego has an important role to play in leading decarbonization efforts within our region. The Framework has been developed in partnership with the UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy, and the University of San Diego (USD) Energy Policy Initiatives Center, and Inclusive Economics. In addition, the Framework fosters regional collaboration between public agencies, universities, schools, business, labor, communities, and tribes, as well as leverage resources at the State and federal levels.

The Framework is composed of three parts: a Technical Report, a Workforce Report, and an Implementation Playbook (Playbook). The draft Playbook is a resource that outlines areas for local governments, organizations, and businesses to consider as they move toward zero carbon emissions. The draft Playbook is currently available for public review until February 2, 2023. The County is also working with UC San Diego School of Urban Studies and Planning to conduct an analysis and evaluation of policy tools that can be considered by the Board to support our regional food system and agricultural community. A draft will be prepared for public comment in summer of 2023. Additional information can be found on our projects page.

Discussions: All (4) Open (4)
  • Buildings Forum

    12 months ago
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    Most building emissions in our region are from fossil fuel consumption by building systems like space heaters and water heaters, so decarbonization typically means replacing these systems with electric systems. Additionally, the vast majority of buildings that will exist in 2050 are already built, so building decarbonization must include existing buildings in addition to decarbonizing new buildings. These include residential and commercial buildings.

    • Q: What are the priorities for you and your community for building decarbonization? Examples: prioritizing low-income households, communities of concern; bringing down costs; minimizing impacts to utilities; expediting rollout; etc.
    • Q: What are about the opportunities and limitations of building  electrification?
    Quick Reply
  • Transportation Forum

    12 months ago
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    Regional transportation accounts for a large portion of regional greenhouse gas emissions. Most transportation emissions reductions strategies focus on reducing vehicle emissions (for example, through increased adoption of electric vehicles, or EVs) and reducing the amount that a vehicle drives per person (measured in “vehicle miles traveled” or VMT; for example, through increasing use of public transit, increased travel through biking, walking, using scooters, and/or more carpooling).

    • Q: What are the opportunities and limitations of these transportation decarbonization strategies?
    Quick Reply
  • Energy Forum

    12 months ago
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    Decarbonizing will require switching electricity generation from fossil fuels to renewable energy and will also require switching sectors like transportation and building systems from fossil fuels to electricity, which will require an increase in renewable energy generation. The RDF Technical Report shows that the region’s energy demand through mid-century can be met by renewable energy resources. Investment decisions to build more renewable energy infrastructure will have trade-offs (e.g., some projects will have lower costs but will require more land to be converted to renewable energy generation). 

    • Q: What do you think are the opportunities to balance priorities to meet regional energy demand?
    Quick Reply
  • Land Use Forum

    12 months ago
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    Natural and working lands (which includes agriculture) naturally store and sequester carbon and provide co-benefits like biodiversity and cleaner air. Land use away change from natural and working lands allows for development, including development of renewable energy.

    • Q: What should be prioritized in your neighborhood and community?
    • Q: What do you think should be prioritized with regional land use?
    Quick Reply
Page last updated: 03 Feb 2023, 08:50 AM